It is said that an iceberg is hidden under water at 90%. This metaphor fits very well into the psychological contract in which most perceptions of the contract are unwritten and hidden, in accordance with their definition. Descriptions and definitions of the psychological contract first appeared in the 1960s, particularly in the work of organizational and behavioral theorists Chris Argyris and Edgar Schein. Since then, many other experts have presented ideas on this subject and continue to do so, either by focusing specifically on the psychological contract or by addressing it from a particular point of view, which are numerous. The psychological contract is a profound and varied concept and open to a wide range of interpretations and theoretical studies. A healthy psychological contract is a contract in which both parties agree that there is a proper balance between donation and taking. This is impossible to achieve where there are many hidden perceptions, so the first goal is to increase openness and mutual awareness. Faced with increased awareness, most people tend to make compromises and work agreements more positive. It is important that staff services are informed of these agreements. Agreements can easily be confused with favouritism or nepotism. Armstrong refers to Edgar Schein`s definition of the 1965 psychological contract as (a little vague) an implication that: „…

there is a series of unwritten expectations that work at any time between each member of an organization and the various managers and other members of that organization… Transparency here refers to the simple and useful availability of information about the organization. It is similar to the openness that will be discussed later and is more concerned with honest two-way communication within an organization. These are not precise definitions of transparency and openness; A single attempt to explain two distinct aspects of organizational clarity and management here. As a concept, the psychological contract will evolve and change, both in its implications and in its definitions. ROUSSEAU, D. (1995) Psychological contract in organizations: understanding written and unwritten agreements. Newbury Park, CA: sage. By definition, the psychological contract represents the understanding of mutual expectations between workers and employers. You will see many different definitions of the psychological contract.